Jonel Segovia

Segovia’s father, coconut vendor Jimmy, leaned on a car for balance as he gasped for air. “My son is innocent,” he said.

Seven people, including three teenagers and a pregnant woman, were shot dead by armed masked men looking for a drug suspect. They did not know where to find him so they fired into the two adjacent shanties.

“These boys are innocent. They killed our boys,” the mothers of Jonel Segovia, Sonny Espinosa, and Angelito Soriano.

According to the teenagers’ mothers, none of their children were drug users or had criminal records. Their only fault was being friends with Santor, they added, angry at claims that the boys were involved in the drug trade.

Segovia’s father, coconut vendor Jimmy, leaned on a car for balance as he gasped for air. “My son is innocent,” he said.

Hours after the massacre, the kin of the victims were pleading with the police and employees of North Star Funeral Homes—the police-accredited funeral home which earlier picked up the dead—to turn over the bodies to them.

Since they were not given the right over their lives, maybe the families could have, at least, the right to handle their death?

When the funeral home refused, the families blocked the vehicles bearing their dead. “You cannot take them and make us pay a fortune. We have no money to pay you. Give us our dead,” said Segovia’s sister, Jenny.

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